Upcoming Meeting

Our Topics in December are:

When Baby Can’t Suck:  Integrated Treatment of Infants Struggling to Feed-Habilitation for oral/cranial/myofascial restrictions and other structural challenges

Newborns and young infants who present with breastfeeding challenges may have underlying structural problems or oral-motor/functional disorders that can stem from tethered oral tissues (tongue, lip, buccal ties), cranial or myofascial restrictions, plagiocephaly (cranio/facial asymmetry), torticollis, or other atypical postures. As a result, these babies can demonstrate difficulty with feeding endurance, feeding efficiency, coordination of suck-swallow-breathe, other problems with function of the oral structures for feeding, and early gross motor development.   Attendees will learn to recognize the red flags for underlying problems and how an interdisciplinary team of therapists can serve to habilitate the infant’s suck to facilitate successful feeding.  In addition to indications for referral, attendees will learn strategies for supporting sucking skills and infant development.

Transition to Solids and Complementary Feeding:  Navigating the Trends and Tools

Depending on which guidelines are followed, babies will typically begin the introduction to solid foods and complementary feeding between 4 to 6 months of age.  Families must navigate not only the advice given by pediatrician and family members, but the influence of ideas popularized through social media.  Should they wean traditionally, or follow baby-led weaning and what does that mean? When should they introduce a cup? Are sippy cups bad?  Is there a critical time period for making the transition? These questions and many others will be answered and guidance will be given from the perspective of the pediatric feeding specialist.  There are critical milestones and a variety of tools that can either help or hinder a child’s progress toward the successful transition to table food and cup drinking.  25 to 40% of all children have some form of a feeding problem and early prevention and intervention is key.  Attendees will learn how to guide families, starting with practices that begin in early infancy, as they nurture their child’s next stages in feeding development.

 

Our Speakers in December are:

Nina Ayd Johanson, MA, MS, CCC-SLP, CEIM, CHHP, a pediatric feeding specialist, is a highly regarded clinician and renowned teacher with more than 23 years experience.  She is an affiliate faculty member at Loyola University Maryland, and senior speech-language pathologist at Kennedy Krieger Institute (KKI). A certified educator of infant massage, Nina also works in private practice in Baltimore and lectures nationally.  Most recently Nina has been involved with developing the TOTs Clinic at KKI where she treats newborns and young infants with breast and/or bottle feeding difficulties in an interdisciplinary specialized program alongside physical therapists trained in manual therapy based on an osteopathic approach to address underlying cranial/fascial restrictions, structural asymmetries, or other issues impacting sucking skills.  She has extensive experience in home-based early intervention and parent training specializing in the evaluation and treatment of children with a wide range of oral motor/feeding disorders, complex medical issues, autism spectrum disorders, and other developmental disabilities. She holds a Master of Science in Speech-language Pathology from Loyola College, and a Master of Arts in Applied Healing Arts from the Tai Sophia Institute (now Maryland University of Integrative Health). She is a board certified holistic health practitioner and was trained in integrative nutrition through the Center for Mind Body Medicine’s Food As Medicine, the nation’s leading clinical nutrition training program for healthcare professionals.

Diane Nemett, PT, MS, DO(MP), is a licensed physical therapist with over 45 years of clinical experience. She has a B.S. degree in Physical Therapy from Ithaca College, an M.S. degree from Johns Hopkins University, and a Doctorate in Osteopathic Manual Practice from the Canadian College of Osteopathy in Toronto. Diane is certified in neurodevelopmental therapy (NDT). She is also certified in (hands-on) energy therapy with Rosalyn Bruyere. She has taught in the masters program at Johns Hopkins University and done published clinical research at the Kennedy Krieger Institute (KKI) and Johns Hopkins Hospital. She is currently a senior physical therapist at KKI’s Child and Family Support Program, a home-based, family-centered intervention program; senior physical therapist at KKI’s outpatient program; and lead therapist at KKI’s Cranial Cervical Clinic, a specialty clinic for infants and children with torticollis and/or plagiocephaly.  Diane also has a private practice in Owings Mills. She has a wide range of clinical experience working with individuals from infancy to adulthood. Most recently she has been involved in the development of the TOTS Clinic at KKI serving infants with breast and/or bottle-feeding difficulties. Specializing in manual physical therapy based on an osteopathic approach, Diane incorporates such modalities as cranial-sacral work, myofascial work, muscle energy techniques, visceral work, strain/counterstrain, and gentle manipulation.

Erin Boland, PT, MA is a licensed physical therapist.  She has 30 years and a wide range of clinical experiences with a focus on home-based early intervention using a family-centered approach.  She is currently the PT Manager of the Child and Family Support Program at Kennedy Krieger Institute (KKI), providing home-based as well as center-based services to infants and children through age 5 with developmental delays, neurologic disorders, chromosomal abnormalities, and other genetic conditions.  She specializes in manual treatment for infants with torticollis and plagiocephaly and most recently has been involved with the development of the TOTS Clinic at KKI where she and a speech-language pathologist treat newborns and young infants with feeding problems who are experiencing concomitant atypical posture and cranial/myofascial restrictions.  Erin has trained through the Upledger Institute and the Barral Institute, incorporating modalities into treatment that include myofascial release, muscle energy techniques, craniosacral therapy and visceral manipulation.  She has also trained in (hands-on) energy therapy with Rosalyn Bruyere.   She has a B.S. degree in Physical Therapy from University of Maryland Baltimore and a M.A degree in Motor Development from University of Maryland College Park.

Janice Laux, PT, MS, DO(MP), PCS is a licensed physical therapist with 40 years of clinical experience treating infants through adults. She specializes in manual physical therapy based on an osteopathic approach, incorporating a variety of modalities including: cranial-sacral, myofascial, and visceral interventions, strain/counterstrain, ,muscle energy and  specific articular techniques. She has a B.S. degree in Physical Therapy from University of Wisconsin-Madison, an M.S. degree from Johns Hopkins University, and a Diploma in Osteopathic Manual Practice from the Canadian College of Osteopathy in Toronto. Janice is certified in neurodevelopmental therapy (NDT), is certified as a pediatric clinical specialist by the APTA and has trained in (hands-on) energy therapy with Rosalyn Bruyere. Janice has taught at the University of Maryland School of Physical Therapy as an affiliate faculty member and presented numerous lectures on topics related to pediatric physical therapy. She is currently manager of training for Kennedy-Krieger Institute’s (KKI) Physical Therapy Department.  She is the lead physical therapist at KKI’s multidisciplinary clinic for children with movement disorders helping to determine the optimal pathway of care and she is the lead therapist treating children and adolescents with persistent post-concussive symptoms.  Most recently Janice has been involved in developing the TOTS Clinic at KKI, serving infants with breast and/or bottle-feeding difficulties.

5 CERPS will be awareded for the conference